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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorMorel, Lucas M.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T14:52:28Z
dc.date.available2018-04-26T14:52:28Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/34107
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOLLOWING A 2-YEAR EMBARGO]en_US
dc.descriptionLucas M. Morel is a member of the Class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractEver since the emergence of dialect speech into popular culture following the conclusion of the Civil War, black writers of vernacular in America have had to manage complicated relationships with both their white editors and their predominantly white reading public. On the one hand, writing dialect stories and poems that seem to render portraits of African-American communities as docile and unsophisticated entertained white readers and editors. This rather homogenous audience often found the literature enjoyable either for some perceived affirmation of their own racial prejudices or for its othering of the language spoken in these communities through exotic romanticization. On the other, this platform offered to dialect writers opened up a potential avenue of socio-political expression unavailable to black artists prior to Reconstruction. Likewise for the black rappers of today, who themselves function within a linguistic sphere separate from what many consider “standard English,” racially prejudicial stereotypes about the genre and its influence on black life in America pervade much of the social discourse generated by the music, but the genre itself dominates popular culture; they too must operate artistically and expressively while speaking to an audience that includes a large segment of people who actively look to find fault and vice within rap lyrics to confirm their prejudicial understanding of the black American identity. The challenge then becomes, how does a black writer, or black rapper, navigate the space between meeting audience expectations and challenging their validity? [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityLucas M. Morel
dc.format.extent65 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Englishen_US
dc.subject.otherLamar, Kendricken_US
dc.title"I Made My Moves With Shackled Feet": Understanding the Subversive in the Poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar and Kendrick Lamar (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderMorel, Lucas M.
dc.subject.fastDunbar, Paul Laurence, 1872-1906en_US
dc.subject.fastPoetryen_US
dc.subject.fastRap (Music)en_US
dc.subject.fastSubversive activitiesen_US
dc.subject.fastRace discriminationen_US


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