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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorHughson, Danielle R.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-26T12:17:00Z
dc.date.available2018-04-26T12:17:00Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/34101
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionDanielle Hughson is a member of the Class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe decision to write on Anne Bradstreet, Mary Shelley, and Sylvia Plath cannot be abstracted from their gender. In the beginning of my thesis process, I was captivated by the question of how male editors affect the works of the women they edit. This led to a series of questions: Do these male editors alter texts significantly from the female writers' original purpose? What do they remove, what do they emphasize, can these choices be seen as affected by gender? And when I narrowed my interest to women who are edited by the men close to them—how does the marital or familial connection between the writer and editor affect those choices? And finally, how do literary scholars more specifically and academic audiences more generally receive, interpret, and acknowledge the writing of women after it had been edited by men? I selected Anne Bradstreet, Mary Shelley, and Sylvia Plath as the subjects of my research because of two criteria. Firstly, because they each had close familial relationships with their male editors. Secondly, because each of their biographies possessed something unique, striking, or sensational which has previously been used to reduce these women to their biography, removing focus and attention from the quality of their work. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityDanielle Hughson
dc.format.extent77 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Englishen_US
dc.title"Dangerously Brainy" Women and their Male Editors (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dcterms.isPartOfRG38
dc.rights.holderHughson, Danielle R.
dc.subject.fastBradstreet, Anne, 1612?-1672en_US
dc.subject.fastShelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, 1797-1851en_US
dc.subject.fastPlath, Sylviaen_US
dc.subject.fastEditorsen_US
dc.subject.fastFamiliesen_US
local.departmentEnglishen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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