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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorCoyle, Emily Fay
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-22T19:08:04Z
dc.date.created2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/16290
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionEmily Fay Coyle is a member of the Class of 2010 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractGirls (N = 26, mean age = 4.38 years) were interviewed using Barbies dressed in gender traditional and nontraditional career outfits about their identification with the dolls and girls' own aspirations and self-efficacy to assess possible self content and the effects of exposure to a counterstereotypic model. Girls identified more often with the dolls in gender traditional career outfits but spoke about identification predominantly in terms of similarity of hair. The majority White sample identified with White dolls more frequently than Black dolls although nonwhite participants reasoned "likeness" to dolls based on skin more frequently than did White participants. Following exposure to the counterstereotypic dolls with gender nontraditional careers, girls affirmed being able to engage in a greater proportion of gender nontraditional careers as an adult than before exposure to these dolls. These results imply that toys themselves may constitute models for children, either constraining or expanding possible selves.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityEmily F. Coyle
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.lcshSex role in children -- United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshSocial psychology -- United States -- Girlsen_US
dc.subject.lcshBarbie dolls -- Social aspectsen_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Psychologyen_US
dc.titleBarbie as a model of gender nontraditional career possible self content for preschool and kindergarten girls (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderCoyle, Emily Fay
local.departmentPsychologyen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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