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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorVilenchik, Maxim
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-10T15:55:21Z
dc.date.available2013-12-10T15:55:21Z
dc.date.created2008
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/24228
dc.descriptionMaxim Vilenchik is a member of the Class of 2008 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.description.abstractGiven the seriousness of the problem, it is surprising that most of the money and effort devoted to addressing it has been restricted to a narrow range of remedies with much of the attention on the incarceration of persons who have already committed crimes. Significantly less consideration has been given to diverting individuals from committing crimes in the first place. This paper initially examines some of the theories on the causes of crime, and why U.S. crime tends to be most prevalent in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods (Reid, 2003). Then I attempt to determine whether some alternative crime remedies would be effective in high-risk communities. My research question seeks to explore the effects of three types social interventions directed toward high-risk youths: early childhood development programs, formal after-school programs, and community recreation centers. I review important findings from previous literature and provide case studies of specific intervention programs which are already publicly implemented and can be replicated and expanded to other locations. Crime in disadvantaged urban neighborhoods is a complex phenomenon that stems from many conditions, including economic, psychological, and environmental factors, which are often interrelated in these communities. Social intervention programs for at-risk youth that are designed to divert some of the risk-factors (discussed in the following section) for crime may have the potential to significantly reduce delinquency and crime. This paper strives to shed more light on this connection and its findings may inspire further research and better public policies. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityMax Vilenchik
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Shepherd Poverty Programen_US
dc.subject.otherLos Angeles' Better Educated Students for Tomorrowen_US
dc.titleHopeful Diversions: Youth Intervention Programs and their Potential for Preventing Delinquency and Crimeen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderVilenchik, Maxim
dc.subject.fastJuvenile delinquency -- Preventionen_US
dc.subject.fastCrimeen_US
dc.subject.fastEducation, Preschool -- Activity programsen_US
dc.subject.fastPerry Preschool Project (Ypsilanti, Mich.)en_US
dc.subject.fastChild-Parent Center Program (Chicago, Ill.)en_US
dc.subject.fastAfter-school programsen_US
dc.subject.fastCommunity centersen_US
dc.subject.fastBoys & Girls Clubs of Americaen_US


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