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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorMorgan, Joseph Railton
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-07T17:59:59Z
dc.date.available2014-05-07T17:59:59Z
dc.date.created2014
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/27884
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT RESTRICTED TO WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY LOGIN]en_US
dc.descriptionJoseph Railton Morgan is a member of the Class of 2014 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractWriters of diverse backgrounds within the classical tradition, whether composing histories of the Roman Republic or treatises on geography, all had something to say about the Celts, and in particular the Gauls, a group of Celtic tribes that Rome dealt with frequently in the Republican period. Certain core elements in the representation of these peoples are traceable in authors as divergent in background, style, and agenda as Polybius of Megalopolis and Gaius Julius Caesar. A comparison of Polybius’ Historiae and Caesar’s Commentarii de Bello Gallico yields insights into the types of historical patterns and cultural observations which ancient writers relied upon to explain the connections between events in their narratives and in doing so engaged with the historiographical tradition. This comparison also highlights the way in which these two representations differed. Before exploring the works of Polybius and Caesar, however, a brief summary of Romano-Gallic relations from the fourth through the first centuries BCE is required in order to provide the historical context of these narratives. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJoseph Morgan
dc.format.extent100 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Classicsen_US
dc.titleHomo Ferus, Terra Divisa: Representations of space and custom north of the Res Publica in the historical narratives of Polybius and Caesar (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderMorgan, Joseph Railton
dc.subject.fastCivilization, Celticen_US
dc.subject.fastCeltsen_US
dc.subject.fastGaulsen_US
dc.subject.fastPolybiusen_US
dc.subject.fastCaesar, Juliusen_US
dc.subject.fastPersonal narrativesen_US
dc.subject.fastRome (Empire)en_US


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