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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorSwabb, Emma M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-22T19:58:57Z
dc.date.available2016-07-22T19:58:57Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33407
dc.descriptionEmma Swabb is a member of the Class of 2016 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.description.abstractThere has been a recent, increasingly bi-partisan focus on solving the issue of mass incarceration in the U.S. However, many of the supporting arguments and policy proposals have been made from an economic, cost-benefit analysis framework. These perspectives overlook the pervasive problem of mass incarceration of the mentally ill. I argue that the United States has specific moral and social obligations to specifically decrease the mass incarceration of the mentally ill because failure to do so threatens the wellbeing and basic liberties of individuals as well as the fundamental justice of our criminal justice system. I support this argument by using John Rawls’s theory of justice as fairness, as articulated by Daniels et. al (2002) and Loury (2008). I also believe that Young (2004) would support the concept of a societal responsibility to curb mass incarceration of the mentally ill for moral reasons. Three broad policy proposals are suggested to reform our current system: improving the availability of mental health services to the currently incarcerated, decreasing the chance that seriously mentally ill individuals are sent to jail, and increasing preventative mental health care in low-income African American communities.en_US
dc.format.extent37 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Shepherd Poverty Programen_US
dc.titleMental Illness and Mass Incarceration: Reframing the Analysis of the U.S. Criminal Justice Systemen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderSwabb, Emma M.
dc.subject.fastMentally ill offenders -- Mental health servicesen_US
dc.subject.fastMentally ill offenders -- Legal status, laws, etc.en_US
dc.subject.fastTheory of justice (Rawls, John)en_US
dc.subject.fastAlternatives to imprisonmenten_US


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