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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorWilbur, John H., III (Jack)
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-27T14:45:48Z
dc.date.available2016-07-27T14:45:48Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33562
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionJohn H. Wilbur, III (Jack) is a member of the Class of 2016 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Closure of the Isthmus of Panama functions as an excellent natural experiment because of our knowledge of the geologic record and the changing environment that influence the temperature, salinity, nutrients, and productivity of each area. The modern day Caribbean resembled the Pacific before the Closure of the Isthmus of Panama. The present day Pacific can serve as an analogue for the ancient Caribbean (Erwin et. al 2011).Extending this thought, life modes that are common within the modern Pacific should be present in the ancient Caribbean (Fortunato 2004). This provides anopportunity to examine how evolution was influenced by the changing productivity within each environment. The Closure of the Isthmus of Panama provides a clear study area in which to test whether environmental or ecological change drives evolution. The two environments generated by the closure provide an excellent opportunity to see how organisms evolve in response to their environments. In this paper, I will be focusing primarily on the physical changes in the environment, specifically planktonic productivity. The fossilized remains of gastropods, bivalves and bryozoans provide an opportunity to study and track these changes. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJohn H. Wilbur, III
dc.format.extent16 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Geologyen_US
dc.titleCan changes in the Larval Developmental Modes of Olivella in the Caribbean Neogene be used as a reliable productivity proxy? (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderWilbur, John H., III (Jack)
dc.subject.fastGastropodaen_US
dc.subject.fastEvolution (Biology) -- Researchen_US
dc.subject.fastMarine ecology -- Researchen_US
dc.subject.fastIndicators (Biology)en_US


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