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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorJuneau, John Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-19T14:49:04Z
dc.date.available2017-05-19T14:49:04Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33859
dc.descriptionJohn Joseph Juneau is a member of the class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.description.abstractPoverty is a long-established economic outcome worthy of scholarly and political concern. The issue of addressing poverty deals primarily with identification: who is poor? This paper constructs a Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) assessing dimensions relevant to Martha Nussbaum’s central capability approach utilizing the framework established by Alkire and Foster (2011). I build upon a similar application of the Alkire and Foster method in Dhongde and Haveman (2015) by providing more sufficient conceptual support for the inclusion of dimensions in the specification and selecting different thresholds for some variables with more robust justification for this selection than the original authors provide. In addition, I make the case for examining the MPI by identifying any person deprived in at least one dimension as poor. My empirical analysis further improves on the work of Dhongde and Haveman by utilizing sample weights present in the American Community Survey (ACS). I estimate my specification of the MPI using one percent samples from the ACS for 2015, and I provide decompositions of the estimate for race, sex, and age by state. I find that 72 percent of Americans are poor such that the poor experience about 18 percent of all possible deprivations. Moreover, I find large and statistically significant sex, race, and age gaps that vary by state.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJohn Juneau II
dc.format.extent48 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Shepherd Poverty Programen_US
dc.titleWho is poor? Poverty in the United States Re-examined from a Multidimensional Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderJuneau, John Joseph
dc.subject.fastCapabilities approach (Social sciences)en_US
dc.subject.fastAmerican Community Surveyen_US
dc.subject.fastPoverty -- Researchen_US


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