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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorKnight, Courtney L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-19T14:36:05Z
dc.date.available2017-06-19T14:36:05Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33905
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionCourtney L. Knight is a member of the Class of 2017 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Swedish government experienced success with their family leave policies because they were designed to promote gender equality and were implemented in a way that would actually encourage the policy’s success. When H.R. 2 was debated in Congress, women in America were lacking the necessary representation to push the problems women were actually facing. According to a report published by the Congressional Research Service, only 33 women were serving in the 102nd Congress, a number that has since risen to 104 women with the 114th Congress (Manning, Brudnick, and Shogan 4-5). The alleged problem solvers serving in the 102nd Congress did not discuss the challenges women face, the people who need family leave, or why a cultural change was truly necessary in 1991-1992. This lack of discussion implies that there was a massive political disconnect between the policy makers, or problem solvers, and the actual problem. Women need representation in Congress that will actually make the conversation about gender inequality and the needs of modern women today. [From Conclusion]en_US
dc.format.extent39 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Politicsen_US
dc.titleThe Maternal Wall in Corporate America: Why the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 Is Failing Mothers Today (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderKnight, Courtney L.
dc.subject.fastEquality -- Government policyen_US
dc.subject.fastFamily and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (United States)en_US
dc.subject.fastRepresentative government and representationen_US


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