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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorBeasley, Abigail E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-19T11:40:31Z
dc.date.available2018-04-19T11:40:31Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33972
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionAbigail E. Beasley is a member of the Class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractA queer, disabled, communist female has become a celebrity of pop culture, although not celebrated for the intersectionality of those things. Rather, she is honored as a woman but stripped by a capitalist society that depoliticizes the fight she fought. The holistic narrative of Kahlo’s experience belongs as a coherent story – not as fragments of flirtation or failure. Her true narrative fights a good fight. The BarbieTM serves as a window into the senseless commodification and reproduction of Mexican culture in the United States has become deeply ingrained in our national culture and identity. Now, in 2018, Kahlo has a first class seat on the feminism bandwagon, while her native culture is trivialized and victim to a blatantly racist discourse driving a corrupt ideology. She is not a commodity of the US to exploit through artistic reproduction. In practice, Kahlo’s image is surviving in a capitalist society as a result of an economic system that she challenged; in theory, that same system is running its course on cultural source communities diminishing their narrative through cultural commodification and unruly reproduction. So in a culture where the word itself can hardly be defined, it is important to preserve the individuals and communities which comprise the world in which we live and learn and express ourselves. ]From concluding section]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityBeasley, Abigail
dc.format.extent20 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Latin American and Caribbean Studiesen_US
dc.titleFor What (?) Frida Kahlo's Worthen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderBeasley, Abigail E.
dc.subject.fastFeminismen_US
dc.subject.fastSex discrimination against womenen_US
dc.subject.fastRace discriminationen_US
dc.subject.fastKahlo, Fridaen_US
dc.subject.fastBarbie dolls -- Social aspectsen_US


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