Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorMah, Andrew V.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-02T14:53:17Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T14:53:17Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/34112
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionAndrew V. Mah is a member of the Class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to combine behavioral and computational analyses to describe the circadian systems of C. turbinata and P. tepidariorum in order to hypothesize adaptive benefits of the observed behaviors. In the first chapter, I will present a series of numerical experiments performed on models that recreate C. turbinata’s short period circadian clock. The results from these numerical experiments will be used to give us greater understanding about the nature of C. turbinata’s molecular oscillators and generate testable hypotheses about the adaptive nature of circadian clocks. In the second chapter, in addition to P. tepidariorum, I will also describe the circadian systems of two other theridiid species as a point of comparison: the subsocial spider, Anelosimus studiosus; and the southern black widow, Latrodectus mactans. The goal of these experiments is to understand the mechanisms underlying the observed variability in spider circadian systems (e.g., FRP, distribution, and affect of light). More generally, understanding how this variability arises can improve mechanistic explanations of adaptive benefits. Examining the free-running behavior, including the FRP and its distribution within a species, of the three Theridiidae spiders will reveal the behavior of their circadian systems in the absence of any external cues, because without the influence of external cues, more endogenous traits about the underlying system become apparent. For example, C. turbinata can entrain its circadian period to LD 12:12. It is only when the specimens are removed from light that their 19-hour endogenous period becomes apparent. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityAndrew Mah
dc.format.extent28 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Neuroscienceen_US
dc.titleComputational models of spider activity patterns integrated with behavioral experiments hypothesize adaptive benefits of the circadian clock (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderMah, Andrew V.
dc.subject.fastSpiders -- Behavioren_US
dc.subject.fastCircadian rhythms -- Mathematical modelsen_US
dc.subject.fastAdaptation (Biology)en_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record