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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorArcher, Hannah
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-18T12:40:30Z
dc.date.available2019-04-18T12:40:30Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/34360
dc.descriptionThis poster was created to present the lab's summer research at Parent's Weekend 2018 and at Science, Society and the Arts 2019.en_US
dc.descriptionPoster; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionHannah Archer is a member of the Class of 2020 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe hypothesize that: Metabolic rate of the snacking rats will decrease more rapidly over time than in control rats; Structure and function of the GI Tract will be compromised as a result of snacking-induced obesity. [From Hypothesis section]en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Summer Research Scholars Programen_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Science, Society and the Artsen_US
dc.titleDoes Snacking-Induced Obesity Impact Metabolic Rate and GI Tract Function in Female Rats? (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderArcher, Hannah
dc.subject.fastObesityen_US
dc.subject.fastSnack foods -- Researchen_US
dc.subject.fastMetabolismen_US


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