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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorClark, Daniel Scarbrough
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T13:22:05Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T13:22:05Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.wlu.edu/handle/11021/34749
dc.description.abstractThe current field of American politics, particularly within the legislative branch, is considered highly polarized and signi cantly inscrutable. In the face of this shifting political landscape, attempts to rigorously analyze the United States Congress under the standard paradigms of qualitative political science have proved partially insufficient, particularly efforts to accurately forecast legislative behavior. We introduce two classes of models to analyze the voting behavior and political topology of the United States Congress. The first are multi-temperature kinetic Ising models and the second are weighted network models. These models are presented first in order to evaluate and study the partisanship and social interactions within Congress, and second as a means of conveying the versatility of statistical physics and network-based computer simulations in non-physical contexts. The physical and theoretical basis of these models are provided, with special attention paid to the distinct challenges and bene ts of applying non-equilibrium statistical physics. The development and legislative forecasting applications of each are then detailed, alongside the results of interest. Each indicate complimentary and contrasting results, which are particularly signi cant when considered alongside modern conceptions of the American political environment.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityDaniel S. Clark
dc.format.extent49 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Physicsen_US
dc.titleStatistical Physics and Network Theory as an Interdisciplinary Approach to Legislative Forecastingen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderClark, Daniel Scarbrough


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