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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorSchirmer, William Robert
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-22T13:46:30Z
dc.date.available2020-05-22T13:46:30Z
dc.date.created2020
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.wlu.edu/handle/11021/34753
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionWilliam Schirmer is a member of the Class of 2020 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper uses the Current Population Survey to examine the differential experiences of demographic groups following the Great Recession. Geographic variation in recession severity is used to asses the effect of recession severity on long term employment outcomes. I use three empirical strategies to find that the effect of recession severity on employment is more severe for men in the short run, but quickly evens before affecting women more deeply. Seven years after the lowest point of employment, women are 100% more affected by local recession severity than men. For a 10% decrease in employment during the recession, this paper finds that women's employment after seven years is 4% lower than if there was no drop in employment during the recession while men's is 2% lower. These findings suggest that women suffer the long term effects of recessions significantly more than men.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityWilliam Schirmer
dc.format.extent31 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Economicsen_US
dc.titleRecession Severity and Lagging Employment (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderSchirmer, William Robert
dc.subject.fastWomen -- Employmenten_US
dc.subject.fastSex discrimination in employment -- Economic aspectsen_US
dc.subject.fastRecessions -- Economic aspectsen_US


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