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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorWeber, Madelyn Jane
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-13T13:56:03Z
dc.date.available2021-05-13T13:56:03Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35203
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionMadelyn Jane Weber is a member of the Class of 2021 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractI exploit variation in the job composition of US local labor markets to determine how automation affects familial outcomes from 1980 to 2019 andl ook at employment, marriage, divorce, and fertility rates as outcomes. Following previous work, I use historical prevalence of routine jobs to measure exposure to automation. I find that individuals susceptible to automation are more likely to become unemployed from 2000 to 2010; however, from 2010 to 2019 these individuals are more likely to become employed and work comparatively more hours. Fertility rates correlate with marriage rates; the results show higher fertility and marriage rates from 1990 to 2000 in local labor markets susceptible to automation, but this trend shifts from 2000 to 2019 as fertility and marriage rates become relatively lower. Moreover, I find that women in areas most susceptible to female-specific automation are more likely to experience lower marriage rates and are simultaneously are more likely to leave the labor force. This finding is correlated with higher fertility rates for women but is not correlated with the fertility rates of men, which may suggest that many women susceptible to automation are becoming single mothers and dropping out of the labor force.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityMadelyn Weber
dc.format.extent35 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Economicsen_US
dc.titleAutomation and Family: Marriage, Divorce, and Fertility Rates (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderWeber, Madelyn
dc.subject.fastAutomationen_US
dc.subject.fastLabor market --United Statesen_US
dc.subject.fastWomen -- Employmenten_US
dc.subject.fastMarriageen_US
dc.subject.fastFamiliesen_US
local.departmentEconomicsen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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