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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorLewis, Mary Pace
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-19T15:09:14Z
dc.date.available2021-05-19T15:09:14Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35361
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionMary Pace Lewis is a member of the Class of 2021 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe courtships of Elizabeth I reveal the personal and political sides of the Queen. However, the separation between Elizabeth the monarch and Elizabeth the woman is often difficult to discern; Elizabeth would agree, as she reminded her court that she lived her life in the open. Ultimately, Elizabeth's letters, speeches, and portraits revealed a common thread. Elizabeth rejected marriage from her earliest speeches and confirmed her preference for virginity through disseminating allegorical, celebratory portraits towards the end of her reign. This image of a devoted, virtuous Queen seems ideal, even aspirational when viewing the portraits of Elizabeth. Additionally, modern interpreters favor this image of a powerful, single Queen. However, Elizabeth's courtships reveal the constant pressure and criticism which came with being an unmarried, childless monarch. However, Elizabeth possessed an exceptional skill at personal and political maneuvering that she wielded throughout her reign. Developed in her youth through a series of traumas, Elizabeth's political prowess called the Queen to wield her unmarried status as source of power. This starkly contrasted to her predecessors Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, and Mary I, who placed much of their value in the traditional feminine pursuits of the time: marriage and motherhood. The young Elizabeth depicted in the portrait at Windsor Castle shattered expectations at her birth, and she carried this defiance throughout her courtships. [From concluding section]en_US
dc.format.extent89 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Historyen_US
dc.titlePower, Perception, and Performance: The Courtships of Elizabeth I (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderLewis, Mary Pace
dc.subject.fastElizabeth I, Queen of England, 1533-1603en_US
dc.subject.fastCourtshipen_US
dc.subject.fastPolitics and governmenten_US
local.departmentHistoryen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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