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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorCleghorn, Jackson Reed
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:02:04Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:02:04Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35366
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOLLOWING A 1-YEAR EMBARGO]en_US
dc.descriptionJackson Reed Cleghorn is a member of the Class of 2021 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractEarly attempts at characterizing the labor movement in Scotland and the rise of Red Clydeside were often too accepting of the received wisdom of the period and as such require some amount of revision. However, revisionist histories of the period often end up making one wonder why the events actually came to be remembered popularly at all. This thesis will argue that critical analysis of this era reveals a radical departure from the pre-war state of politics in the city, and a unique moment in the city that displayed characteristics unseen in other parts of the country. The facts of the matter, as they were both at the time and as they appear to recipients of the culturally transmitted legend of Red Clyde point towards a genuinely significant change in political culture brought about during and after the First World War, generated in varying degrees by wartime unrest and post-war labor-based political organization, a change that came about thanks to conditions in Glasgow that make it an exception to trends in the rest of the country. The cultural conception of this significant change deserves to be analyzed as well, both from its source from eyewitnesses as well as from subsequent generations that have been culturally aware of something that is Red Clydeside. With all this in mind, it becomes clear that, while the efficacy of the wartime and post-war movements was certainly less than revolutionary, the fact remains that Glasgow from 1914 to 1922 was a place in which real political change occurred, and occurred in ways and for reasons that, while similar to the events taking place throughout the country, were unique. Red Clydeside, then, is a period that is both unique and significant. [From introductory section]en_US
dc.format.extent98 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Historyen_US
dc.titleRevolt on the Clyde: Birth and Significance of Red Clydeside, 1914-1922 (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderCleghorn, Jackson Reed
dc.subject.fastScotland -- Glasgowen_US
dc.subject.fastLabor movement -- Political activityen_US
dc.subject.fastLabor leadersen_US
local.departmentHistoryen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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