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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorIrwin, Rebekah Rose
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-24T18:35:21Z
dc.date.available2021-05-24T18:35:21Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35367
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT AVAILABLE FOLLOWING A 5-YEAR EMBARGO]en_US
dc.descriptionLayne K. Smith is a member of the Class of 2020 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe novel, apart from telling a story, has many responsibilities. One of these responsibilities, and the one most relevant to this project, is that of conveying a particular worldview. Regardless of whether the worldview is relatable to the reader, it should tell some truth or serve some purpose outside of the story itself. When it comes to the genre of detective and crime fiction, however, one probably wouldn't expect these stories to do this -- that is, illustrate a perspective. Instead, the crime narrative is more often seen as a form of escapism from the most mundane parts of life, or perhaps as a solution to fictional -- and nonfictional -- evils. And while these accounts hold true for the genre, they forget that regardless, this genre tells more than a story; And it is this concept that this thesis explores. In tracing the Golden Age of Detective Fiction, and the stories of Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers in particular, I identify and contextualize the ways their lives -- as interwar women -- shaped their novels and characters. The historical and biographical approach I employ in this project also helps find the female detective, and takes a closer look at how she reflects and challenges the constructs of femininity of interwar England and beyond.en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityRebekah R. Irwin
dc.format.extent78 pagesen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Englishen_US
dc.titleFinding the Female Detective: How Interwar Female Authors Created & Sustained the Golden Age of Detective Fiction (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderIrwin, Rebekah Rose
dc.subject.fastWomen detectivesen_US
dc.subject.fastWomen authorsen_US
dc.subject.fastDetective and mystery fictionen_US
local.departmentEnglishen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


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