Show simple item record

dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorShatadal, Alankrit
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-27T11:44:56Z
dc.date.available2021-05-27T11:44:56Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35372
dc.descriptionThesis; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionAlankrit Shatadal is a member of the Class of 2021 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe mystery and devastation of losing a child like this has led to SIDS being widely studied, through lenses of both human biology and human behavior. This thesis will contribute to this work through two goals: First, I would like to propose a new model for understanding variation in SIDS rates. The proposed scaffolded model combines two established explanations for health disparities, (1) biological legacies of trauma and (2) the impact of inequality on health with understandings of subjugation of certain U.S. racial minorities. These factors have to date never been considered as a synergistic explanation for SIDS. To build my argument for this model, in the coming chapter, I will explain what is known about SIDS from biological studies, as well as the risk factors and insufficient hypotheses which tried to explain SIDS pathology. From that point, I will introduce biological anthropology's take on the relationship between trauma environments and their encoding into one's health, which is crucial to understanding the rest of my argument. The final step in my argument will be explaining SIDS risk as a function of racial trauma, both past and present, which presents itself in a myriad of health determinants, both social and biological. This thesis will also provide clarity about SIDS and its risk factors, as the field has had many contradictory and sometimes spurious results. I will explain misinterpretations about the risk factors associated with SIDS to advocate the clarity of my model and the subject in general, which will entail a deeper dive into untangling variables often misconstrued with socioeconomic status (SES) and racial influences upon those factors. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.format.extent79 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Honors in Anthropologyen_US
dc.titleSudden Infant Death Syndrome Evaluated as Epigenetically Maintained Historical Trauma (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderShatadal, Alankrit
dc.subject.fastEpigeneticsen_US
dc.subject.fastRacismen_US
dc.subject.fastNarrative medicineen_US
dc.subject.fastPsychic trauma -- Treatmenten_US
local.departmentAnthropologyen_US
local.scholarshiptypeHonors Thesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record