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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorRicks, James Minh
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T17:27:49Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T17:27:49Z
dc.date.created2021
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://dspace.wlu.edu/handle/11021/35398
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT WILL BE AVAILABLE FOLLOWING A 1-YEAR EMBARGO]en_US
dc.descriptionJames Minh Ricks is a member of the Class of 2021 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractRemote Area Medical, a healthcare nonprofit based in Rockford, Tennessee, attempts to shore up health disparities experienced by rural Americans, "prevent[ing] pain and alleviat[ing] suffering by providing free, quality healthcare to those in need." This they accomplish through a care model of pop-up clinics. Distinct from permanent hospitals or brick-and-mortar clinics, pop-up clinics like RAM's usually only remain in a community for a weekend and are designed to process a high volume of patients, often serving 1,000+ individuals over the space of three days. . . . This research will investigate patient autonomy as an extension of patient dependence on RAM services. To that end, the first component of the research methodology will seek to understand whether RAM patients consider RAM services as a supplemental or replacement healthcare measure compared to more traditional forms of healthcare. Data to reach these conclusions will come from patient registration archives -- these contain information about patient health, demographics and healthcare histories -- from Virginia RAM clinics conducted over the last 15 years. This is followed up with a focus on underlying patient attitudes that form the foundation of those observations, furnished by in-person, in-depth interviews. These extend the investigation of dependency to one of patient agency and autonomy. Do RAM patients think of RAM as a replacement healthcare service in itself? If so, what consequences does that have for the kind of care they expect to receive? What obligations does RAM have to such a population? Do patients depend on RAM from a financial standpoint, or is hypothetical dependence on RAM services the product of intersectional needs related to healthcare? These are just some of the questions that this research will identify and address. [From Introduction]en_US
dc.description.statementofresponsibilityJames Ricks
dc.format.extent30 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Shepherd Poverty Programen_US
dc.titleRAMifications for Healthcare: Remote Area Medical and Healthcare Access in Rural Virginia (thesis)en_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderRicks, James Minh
dc.subject.fastRural health servicesen_US
dc.subject.fastPublic healthen_US
dc.subject.fastVirginia -- Rockbridge Countyen_US


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