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dc.rights.licenseIn Copyrighten_US
dc.creatorHartness, Ralston C.
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-19T12:57:12Z
dc.date.available2018-04-19T12:57:12Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11021/33978
dc.descriptionCapstone; [FULL-TEXT FREELY AVAILABLE ONLINE]en_US
dc.descriptionRalston C. Hartness is a member of the Class of 2018 of Washington and Lee University.en_US
dc.description.abstractCountless scholars have contributed to our contemporary understanding of pilgrimage and the question of authenticity which it raises. This paper begins with a review of prominent secondary literature on pilgrimage, tourism, and modernity before exploring the concern for authenticity as it is articulated on the Camino de Santiago. According to Charles Taylor, however, this concern for authenticity has been worn out by our prevailing modern discourse. Much of modern ethnography and study of the Camino prioritizes individual, diverse, and self-fulfilling authenticities, which may be just as one-sided as another familiar critique, namely that authenticity resides in a “lost” past. It is the aim of this analysis to examine the theoretical lenses which inform the debates we have about authenticity on the Camino, as well as to reach past the dichotomy between “lost” authenticity and modern, “personally-negotiated” authenticity in order to retrieve a wholeness that is intrinsic to “The Way” itself. In its attempt to retrieve a fuller legacy of the Camino and to embrace the paradoxes present in it, this paper argues for an approach to pilgrimage which acknowledges its historical legacy and does not shy from its inexplicability.en_US
dc.format.extent33 pagesen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsThis material is made available for use in research, teaching, and private study, pursuant to U.S. Copyright law. The user assumes full responsibility for any use of the materials, including but not limited to, infringement of copyright and publication rights of reproduced materials. Any materials used should be fully credited with the source.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subject.otherWashington and Lee University -- Capstone in Religionen_US
dc.titleReturning to "The Way": Reframing Authenticity to Embrace the Paradoxes of the Camino de Santiagoen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.rights.holderHartness, Ralston C.
dc.subject.fastCamino de Santiago de Compostelaen_US
dc.subject.fastPilgrims and pilgrimagesen_US
dc.subject.fastAuthenticity (Philosophy)en_US


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